歡迎辭

Dr. Frank Fu image

Prof. Frank H. Fu

President & Chair of Organizing Committee of SCSEPF

Invitation from Prof. Fu

On behalf of The Society of Chinese Scholars on Exercise Physiology and Fitness (SCSEPF), it is my great pleasure to invite you to attend the 15th SCSEPF Annual Conference to be held on July 21 and 22 in 2016 at Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong, China. The main theme of the Conference is “Active Aging, Quality of Life and Physical Activity as Medicine: Where is the Science?” SCSEPF is a non-profit professional organization committed exclusively to the advancement and improvement of exercise physiology and fitness. The inauguration of SCSEPF was in 2002 and the major goals of the Society include unifying scholars in exercise physiology and fitness in different Chinese societies and worldwide to promote and support the study, practice, teaching, research and development of the exercise physiology and fitness profession, and promoting the growth and application of the quality research of exercise physiology and fitness among Chinese scholars in athletic training, health promotion, sports injury prevention and rehabilitation. At present, SCSEPF members are mainly from Mainland China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Macau, Australia and the United State of America. SCSEPF is undergoing development and the annual conference is considered to be a good opportunity for members to explore current developments of exercise physiology and fitness in other parts of the world. It also provides a platform for scholars worldwide to exchange cutting edge research findings and trends. I hereby invite you to participate in the 15th annual SCSEPF conference. Looking forward to seeing you in Hong Kong in the coming July.

Dr. Joseph Levy image

Prof. Joseph Levy

Deputy Chair of the Conference

Invitation from Prof. Levy

For the first time in the history of modern civilization the human race has reached a milestone: Over 20% of the world's population will be 65 years of age and older. However, this is only part of the good news. The other part, is that this aging cohort will be healthier and more engaged with life than any other similar age cohort in the past. We welcome you to a new Age of Active Living that will require a massive shift in the paradigm that has been used in the past to plan for this aging population. The emerging global aging cohort will require creative and innovative strategies for optimizing opportunities for health, education, housing, civic engagement, transportation and of course health care. This conference has been conceived and designed to implement the most comprehensive definition of ACTIVE AGING. A definition that refers to participation in the most expansive social, economic, political cultural, spiritual and civic affairs. Yes, not just the ability to be physically active. Active Aging assumes a holistic paradigm that requires macro, meso and micro policy and programmatic leadership. The old models that relegated the elderly to a life of passivity and inactivity will no longer be accepted by the elderly or enlightened society. Empowering the elderly to live, play, work and contribute to the overall fabric of society is a realistic goal that is the underlying principle of this conference and exhibition.

2014 was our first effort at establishing this new ACTIVE AGING foundation for post-modern society. And we look forward to working with the conference participants and other local, national and international partners, in setting the stage for our 2016 ACTIVE AGING AND QUALITY OF LIFE Conference.

主題演講

Dr. Joseph Levy image

Prof. Joseph Levy

Prof. Russel Pate image

Prof. Russell R. Pate

Bradley J. Cardinal image

Prof. Bradley J Cardinal


Prof. Liu Yuanlong image

Prof. Yuanlong Liu

Prof. Stephen Wong image

Prof. Stephen Wong

Prof. John Reilly image

Prof. John Reilly

Dr. Mark Kelly image

Dr. Mark Kelly

Dr. Frank Fu image

Dr. Hongwei Guan

Dr. Jeffrey Cheung image

Prof. Jeffrey Cheung

  • Professor Levy is an international Public Health speaker, author, and consultant on Recreation, Leisure and Sport. Given the overwhelming global research that supports the preventative and mitigating role of Recreation, Leisure and Sport in a myriad of chronic diseases such as diabetes, cancer and heart disease as well as mental illness and the role that Recreation, Leisure and Sport plays in developing mental and physical resiliency in modern society, Dr. Levy continues to write, lecture and act as a role model for the importance of "Active Living" at all ages.

    Dr. Levy has four university degrees: BA (Psychology-Wilfrid Laurier University), BPhE (Physical Education, University of Waterloo), M.S.W. (Social Work, Wilfrid Laurier University) and a PhD (Health Planning- University of Waterloo). In addition to his academic work in Canada, Dr. Levy has been invited to lecture, conduct research and consult at Universities, hospitals, clinics, spas and health related programs in the United States, South America, Europe, Asia and the Middle East.

    Presently he holds academic appointments as an Adjunct Professor in the Department of Recreation and Leisure Studies, Faculty of Health and Community Studies, Mount Royal University, Calgary, Alberta, Canada and as an International Professor, United States Sports Academy, Mobile, Alabama, USA. He also holds several Research Professorships at Universities in mainland China.

    Professor Levy has published four books: Play Behavior (Wiley, 1975); Leisure Today (Back Door Press, 1980); It's Never Too Early (General, 1985); The All-In-One Guide to Natural Remedies and Supplements (AGES, 2000); and two booklets, Time To Live: A Guide To Pleasurable Retirement, (1985); and Live It Up, (1995). He has also published over 60 scientific peer-reviewed articles and hundreds of professional and trade articles. He has served on the editorial board and acted as Guest Editor of a number of academic, professional and commercial Journals.

    He was one of founding member of the modern World Leisure Organization(WLO) and has been appointed to the prestigious American Leisure Academy.

    Over the past 40 years, Dr. Levy has participated in over $30 Million of basic and applied research projects. His last project was an $8 Million 6-year Public Health community action based research program directed at using Recreation, Leisure and Sport to mitigate the impact of poverty on a myriad of mental and physical chronic diseases. For this groundbreaking research which collaborated with all the municipalities in Greater Metropolitan Toronto, he was awarded the prestigious Service Recognition Award (2005) from the City of Toronto, Public Health Department: " In recognition for the outstanding service you provided for Toronto Public Health."

    Dr. Levy is also very active consulting in the Health Promotion, Retirement, Healthy Communities and Wellness field. He has worked with such international corporations as Global TV, CTV, CBC, IBM, The Mutual Group, General Motors, Brooks, General Foods, Alcon Canada Inc., CN Railroads, Institute Esthederm, and dozens of other Canadian, European, Asian and American organizations.

    In order to better communicate with the public, Dr. Levy also writes regularly for newspapers (Toronto Star, Globe and Mail, K-W Record) and consumer-type magazines that deal with topics ranging from active aging, alternative and complementary medicine, to stress management and general lifestyle issues. Between 1980 and 1990 he also produced and hosted a syndicated TV show entitled IN SHAPE FOR LIFE (CKCO TV- Kitchener- CTV affiliate).

    With his wife Marilyn Libin and 12 grandchildren, Dr. Levy a former International Race Walking competitor represented Canada at a number of major International events, including a member of the 1969, Canadian Maccabiah Track and Field team. Today he is an avid recreational sports enthusiast who enjoys golfing, hiking, biking, and swimming. In conjunction with his international lecturing and consulting as well as Marilyn's passion for supporting community philantrophy projects and for exploring different cultures, they devote a lot of their leisure time to travelling the globe. Dr. Levy has been an active member of Rotary International, Maccabiah Canada as well a number of other voluntary organizations.

    Abstract

    The evolution and acceptance of physical activity as prevention, treatment and management of modern cardiovascular heart disease

    Heart disease has a long history dating back to the Egyptian Pharohes, 3500 years back. However while its recorded documentation may be very old, the treatment of heart disease has made great progress since the Egyptian mummies who were recently studied died of heart disease.

    While heart disease continues to be the number one killer of men and women in the North America today and while Heart disease is also considered the top preventable disease in North by altering poor lifestyle habits such as poor diet, lack of regular exercise, drug or alcohol abuse and high stress. one lifestyle habit has yet to receive the research and application that it can play in preventing, treating and managing heart disease: PHYSICAL ACTIVITY.

    The Future of Heart Disease Treatment

    This paper presents the modern evolution of the application of physical activity in the prevention, treatment and management of modern heart disease in North America, beginning with the pioneering work of Dr. Dudley White to save the life of President Dwight D. Eisenhower. While today we have developed very sophisticated medical surgical and pharmaceutical treatment strategies for heart disease. Physical activity is still not the first line of prevention, treatment and management of heart disease. The author suffers from a very rare form of heart disease-AMYLOIDOSIS-heretofore misdiagnosed and hence almost no research on the role that Physical activity could play with this heart disease.

    While we’ve learned from the study on Egyptian mummies and the work of modern heart scientists, we don’t yet know it all. We’re still a long way from completely addressing the modern versions this disease from human history.

    Dr. Joseph Levy image

    Prof. Joseph Levy

  • Russell R. Pate, is a Professor in the Department of Exercise Science in the Arnold School of Public Health at the University of South Carolina. He has held several administrative positions including Chair, Department of Exercise Science; Associate Dean for Research, Arnold School of Public Health; and Vice Provost for Health Sciences.

    Pate is an exercise physiologist with interests in physical activity and physical fitness in children and the health implications of physical activity. He has published more than 300 scholarly papers and has authored or edited eight books. His research has been supported by the National Institutes of Health, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the American Heart Association, and several private foundations and corporations.

    He heads a research team that is currently supported by multiple grants from the National Institutes of Health and from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. He coordinated the effort that led to the development of the recommendation on Physical Activity and Public Health of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the American College of Sports Medicine (1995). He served on the U.S. Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee (2003-04), the U.S. Physical Activity Guidelines Advisory Committee (2007-08), and an Institute of Medicine panel that developed guidelines on prevention of childhood obesity.

    He currently serves as Chair of the National Physical Activity Plan Alliance. Pate has served in several leadership positions with the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM), and in 1993-94 served as that organization's president. He is a past-president of the National Coalition on Promoting Physical Activity. In 2012 he received the Honor Award from the American College of Sports Medicine.

    Abstract

    Policies for Promotion of Physical Activity and Prevention of Obesity in Youth

    Obesity rates among children and adolescents in the developed countries of the world have increased dramatically since the 1970’s. During that same period numerous secular changes have combined to reduce the demand for physical activity in day-to-day life, and many barriers to physical activity are now evident. As a consequence, most children and youth do not meet the accepted public health guidelines for physical activity. Accordingly, public health interventions are needed to increase physical activity in youth. Such interventions, if successfully implemented, can be expected to improve fitness and health as well as reduce the prevalence of overweight and obesity in young people.

    Promotion of physical activity in populations of children and adolescents will require comprehensive strategic planning and adoption of new policies in multiple societal sectors. These sectors include education, public health, health care, sport, faith-based settings, recreation and parks, transportation, and mass media. This lecture will present policies and programs for promotion of physical activity in youth, including specific strategies and tactics in multiple societal sectors. A case will be made for comprehensive national and international strategic planning aimed at effective and large-scale implementation of these strategies and tactics.

    Prof. Russell R. Pate image

    Prof. Russell R. Pate

  • Dr. Bradley J. Cardinal is a Full Professor in the Kinesiology Program at Oregon State University where he has served since 1997 and where, in 2009, he received the university’s Elizabeth P. Ritchie Distinguished Professor award. Prior to his appointment at Oregon State, Brad served on the faculties of Wayne State University (Detroit, MI) and Eastern Washington University (Cheney, WA).

    His research and scholarship seeks to understand the psychosocial and socio-cultural factors associated with physical activity and health behavior among diverse audiences, including cross-cultural, international, and collaborative studies with scholars from China, Finland, France, Hong Kong, Iran, South Korea, Taiwan, and Thailand. His international experience includes serving as a Visiting Scholar In-Residence at Hong Kong Baptist University. Brad’s work is uniquely multidisciplinary, integrating several subdisciplinary areas within the field and spanning several professional areas touched by the field. He has authored or coauthored more than 300 articles, chapters, reports, or reviews; and given more than 270 professional and scholarly presentations. In addition he has co-authored two books, each in multiple edition. With the exception of one year, he has had continuous grant support since 1988. His work has been cited in many research and government reports, including the landmark 1996 Surgeon General’s Report on Physical Activity and Health. Brad’s leadership activities include service as President of the Research Consortium of the American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance; Secretary/Treasurer of the National Academy of Kinesiology; Associate Editor-In-Chief, Editor, Co-Editor, and Editorial Board member of the American Journal of Health Promotion; Editorial Board Member, Journal of Physical Education, Recreation and Dance; Associate Editor of the Journal of Sport Behavior; Editorial Board member of the Korean Journal of Sport Psychology; Editorial Board member of Quest; Editorial Board Chair, Editorial Board member, and Psychology Section Editor of Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport; and Editorial Board member of Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology. Brad completed his Ph.D. with distinction at Temple University (Philadelphia, PA). He is Fellow #475 of the National Academy of Kinesiology; a Fellow in the American College of Sports Medicine; a Fellow in the North American Society of Health, Physical Education, Recreation, Sport and Dance Professionals; and a Fellow in the Research Consortium of the American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance. In 2013 he received the “Distinguished Scholar Award” from the National Association for Kinesiology in Higher Education and also the “Distinguished Service Award” from the Research Consortium of the American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance. In 2014 he received a “Service Award” from the National Academy of Kinesiology and also the "Robert J. Ritson Honorary Life Member Award" from the Oregon Society of Health and Physical Education. In 2015 he delivered the C. H. McCloy Lecture at the SHAPE America National Convention and Expo in Seattle, WA.

    Abstract

    Toward a Greater Understanding of the Syndemic Nature of Hypokinetic Diseases

    Physical activity participation has historically been conceptualized at the individual level with a strong emphasis on apparently healthy people. However, in the latter part of the 20th century and early part of the 21st century, a paradigm shift emerged whereby physical activity participation increasingly was acknowledged to be dependent on factors residing beyond an individual’s control, with programming and intervention efforts necessary across the lifespan, in multiple settings, and under various life circumstances. This shifting emphasis has created opportunities and challenges for those involved in physical activity program delivery and research. In this presentation physical activity behavior change, promotion, and retention efforts will be reviewed and critiqued.

    Emerging from this critical analysis is an understanding of the syndemic nature of hypokinetic diseases (i.e., the diseases associated with disuse and physical inactivity). The term syndemics is used to account for the interplay and synergistic nature of person, place, and timing in the development of disease. Not only are individual lifestyle behaviors and social factors considered in syndemics, but so too are the forces that link those causes together. To genuinely affect change among the masses, those involved in delivering physical activity interventions and programming must not only address each lifestyle behavior and social affliction that contributes to hypokinetic diseases, but also to the social and environmental forces that link those causes together (e.g., stigma, unequal access to resources).

    Prof. Bradley J Cardinal image

    Prof. Bradley J Cardinal

  • Dr. Yuanlong Liu is a professor and chair of the Department of Human Performance and Health Education at Western Michigan University. As a well-known scholar, Dr. Liu played an important role to connect physical activity and health professionals from different cultures around the world. Because of the significant contribution to the field of measurement and evaluation, he received SHAPE AMERICA R. Tait McKenzie Award (2015) and the 2010 Honor Award of the Measurement and Evaluation Council of AAHPERD.

    Dr. Liu served as the 2011-1014 President of the International Society of Physical activities and Health. Dr. Liu was the co-guest editor of the Routledge 2012 London Olympic Special issue. Nine keynote presentations have been made in international and national conferences. Dr. Liu is the past Editor-in-Chief of Measurement in Physical Education and Exercise Science. He is now serving as the associate editor for the Journal of Exercise Science and Fitness. Dr. Liu’s research interest focuses on measurement and evaluation issues in health fitness, education and physical performances, computer simulation and application in measurement and evaluation, and effectiveness of competition structures in sports. He published more than sixty peer reviewed publications both nationally and internationally.

    Sixty more research presentations at national and international conventions.

    Abstract

    Ratio Variables in Kinesiology Research - Their Uses, Problems, and Alternatives

    A ratio variable is a composite variable which consists of a numerator variable and a denominator variable such as Waist and Hip Ratio and Vo2/kg. Ratio variables have been very popularly used in the health related kinesiology fields. There were two main purposes of this investigation.

    There a several issues for using ratio variables. In the literature, ratio variables are used without any validation to see how variation of the numerator and denominator variables would affect the variation of the ratio. The reliability of numerator and denominator would affect the reliability of the ratio. We do not know to what extent the ratio variable affects the circularity of the matrix of ratio scores, which really affect the Type I error rate in RM ANOVA. The first was to examine the validity and reliability of commonly used ratio variables in human kinetics research, and to evaluate four ratio score models used to deflate the effect of the denominator. The second was to use computer simulation procedures to investigate the effect of using ratio variables on the circularity assumption of the covariance matrix, type I error rates, and power in RM ANOVA tests. It shows that a commonly used deflation model for all ratio variables may not exist and different models should be used to derive an appropriate deflation model in empirical research. The results indicate that high reliability of the component variables does not necessarily result in high reliability of the transformed ratio variable. Thus, when a ratio variable is used the reliability should be examined based on the ratio variable data. It is recommended that five criteria be used to evaluate and compare the validity of deflation models: (a) zero correlation between a derived ratio variable and the denominator variable, (b) no curvilinear relationship between the derived ratio and the denominator in the scatterplots, (c) equality of the estimated expected value of the model and calculated mean of the derived ratio data, (d) high R2, and (e) high reliability of the derived ratio data. Simulation results show that the characteristics of the two component variables (ɛx1, ɛx2, Vx1/Vx2, and ρx1x2) strongly affect the circularity of the covariance matrix of the ratio variable, and the type I error rate in RM ANOVA tests. In general, the mean ^ɛx1/x2 exhibited the greatest bias and the largest standard deviation, resulting in a serious inflation of type I error rate in the condition Vx1/Vx2=0.5, regardless the conditions ɛx1, ɛx2, and ρx1x2. If homogeneity of the denominator variable (small Vx2) and large sample size are present, it may reduce likelihood of bias in ^ɛx1/x2 and protect the type I error rate. The study shows that the statistical power in a one way RM ANOVA test has a positive relationship with both the between trial correlation of the numerator and of the denominator.

    Prof. Liu Yuanlong image

    Prof. Yuanlong Liu

  • Stephen H. S. Wong is Professor and Chairman of the Department of Sports Science & Physical Education at the Chinese University of Hong Kong (CUHK). He also serves as Co‐Director of the Hong Kong Institute of Educational Research of the university.

    Professor Wong is a Fellow of the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) and the Hong Kong Association of Sports Medicine & Sports Science, and Honorary Professor of the University of Sydney. He focuses his research on physical activity and sedentary behavior on schoolchildren, and nutritional and metabolic aspects of exercise. He has published extensively in the leading journals of his field and is currently conducting several government‐funded research projects aimed at understanding how schoolchildren in Hong Kong compensate their sleep and physical activity over weekends. He also serves as associate editor and member of the editorial board of various international journals in the area of sports and exercise science. Professor Wong obtained his Ph.D. in Exercise Physiology from Loughborough University as a Commonwealth Scholar. He is currently the Outstanding Fellow of the Faculty of Education at CUHK.

    Abstract

    Physical Activity and Sedentary Behaviour for Young Populations Residing in Ultra-dense Metropolis

    Physical activity is crucial for children’s health and positive growth. However, children in Hong Kong tend to live an inactive lifestyle nowadays. The knowledge of factors that influence children’s physical activity as well as sedentary behaviours is important to tackle this trend. Social and built environment has been shown to play an important role in shaping children’s physical activity behaviours in Western countries.

    Hong Kong, like other Asian metropolises, differs from Western cities by its ultra-dense population, social and built environment. The physical activity-environment relationship may vary across contexts. This presentation will summarize research findings related to the environmental correlates of physical activity and sedentary behaviours for Chinese children in Hong Kong.

    Prof. Stephen Wong image

    Prof. Stephen Wong

  • Prof John J Reilly (BSc, PhD) is Professor of Physical Activity and Public Health at the University of Strathclyde, Scotland. He leads a large and productive Physical Activity for Health (PAH) Group at Strathclyde ( www.strath.ac.uk/humanities/psychologicalscienceshealth/physicalactivityforhealth ).

    He was previously Professor of Paediatric Energy Metabolism at the University of Glasgow, and Postdoctoral Fellow at the MRC Dunn Nutrition Unit Cambridge. His research work focuses on: the health impact of physical activity and sedentary behaviour in childhood and adolescence; child and adolescent obesity aetiology, surveillance, prevention, treatment, and consequences; public health surveillance of physical activity and sedentary behaviour. He has published over 230 papers and has an h index of 42.

    His Knowledge Exchange contributions include: WHO committee work (notably on the WHO Commission for Ending Childhood Obesity, ‘ECHO’ www.who.int/end-childhood-obesity/en/ ); leadership of national and international Active Healthy Kids Report Cards (www.activehealthykidsscotland.co.uk; www.activehealthykids.org) ; contribution to evidence-based guidelines on physical activity, sedentary behaviour, and obesity; capacity building in PAH and NCDs internationally, including leadership of the new MSc in Physical Activity and NCD Prevention and Control at Strathclyde.

    Abstract

    When does it all go wrong? Insights from recent longitudinal studies of changes in physical activity and sedentary behaviour in childhood and adolescence

    Historically, children have been seen as highly active ‘supercharged dynamos’ who remain active until adolescence. In many countries physical activity policies and research priorities therefore focus largely or entirely on adolescents and adults. Evidence over the past few decades challenges the view that physical activity is high (or even adequate) in children, articularly in high-income countries. The presentation will focus on the most recent evidence from longitudinal studies using objective measures of physical activity and sedentary behaviour. These studies suggest that substantial physical activity declines, and sedentary behaviour increases, are evident by early –mid-childhood. The applications and implications of these studies will be discussed.

    Prof. John Reilly image

    Prof. John Reilly

  • Mark received his Ph.D. in Education Administration and Exercise Physiology from the University of New Orleans. His dissertation was entitled "The relationships of Self-Efficacy, Exercise and Social Support with Strain and Burnout in Faculty". This research further reinforced his holistic approach to health and wellness.Mark's business- Principle-Centered Health Human Performance Services, specializes in health and fitness assessments and delivering health and fitness programs to corporations and small groups.

    He has taught in several universities and colleges for the last 20 years. He has consulted for fitness equipment infomercial companies as the principle scientist doing physiological testing and statistical analysis. He is a member of the International Society of Sports Nutritionists, National Strength and Conditioning Association, National Wellness Institute and served as Exercise Science Director of the National Federation of Professional Trainers and as an Exercise Physiologist for the American Council on Exercise. Mark earned a national ranking of 6th in 1992 in his age group for duathlons, he has run several marathons, distance trail runs, mud runs, and even won the only body building contest he ever entered.

    Abstract

    Train your Brain: A holistic approach to enhancing brain health

    Many people are concerned with keeping their bodies healthy, but have little regard for the health of the master of it all- the brain. Recent discoveries show how brain health can be dramatically affected by our lifestyles, including how much we exercise, how we sleep, eat, and even think. This presentation will first explore the different aspects of the brain and how we affect it by what we do.

    Just by having a positive perspective, we open up new neural paths that then cause us to think positive. Exercise itself enhances neural plasticity and when we combine physical exercise with cognitive challenges it really opens up the neuroplasticity gateways, and starts the brain enhancement process going.

    Dr. Mark Kelly image

    Dr. Mark P. Kelly

  • Hongwei Guan received his B.S. (Exercise Physiology) and M.Ed. (Exercise Biochemistry) degrees from Beijing Sport University. He earned his Ph.D. in Human Performance (Motor Control/Learning) with a minor in computer science from Indiana University – Bloomington.

    Dr. Guan is currently a tenured Associate Professor in the Department of Health Promotion and Physical Education, School of Health Sciences and Human Performance at Ithaca College. He has served as the Director of HSHP China Exchange Programs, Coordinator of the Ithaca College Global Service Learning Program in Beijing Organizing Committee for the Olympic Games in 2008. He has served as the Culture and Education Program Expert for the 2nd Youth Olympic Games in Nanjing in 2014. Dr. Guan also served as the President of the International Chinese Society for Physical Activities and Health (ICSPAH, 2007-2008).

    Dr. Guan’s research interests include motor skills, physical activity, physical fitness and health promotion, measurement and evaluation, aging and balance, training and elite performance, and technology application. Dr. Guan is also interested in the impact of global experiential learning, culture and diversity. He is an active promoter of sport and physical activities as a platform for cultural education. Dr. Guan has been invited to universities, national and international conferences in Canada, China, Great Britain, Australia, USA, Hong Kong, and Taiwan and has made 70+ presentations, keynotes, lectures, and workshops. Because of his outstanding performance in teaching, scholarship, and service, Dr. Guan received the Ithaca College Faculty Excellence Award in 2009. He has also received the Dean Service Award in 2008, as well as the ICSPAH Outstanding Service Award in 2009.

    Abstract

    Balance: Beyond Postural Control

    Postural instability and unintentional falling is one of the leading causes of injury and death among the elderly. Maintaining balance and postural stability while performing functional activities is critical to an individual’s independence and quality of life. Tai Chi has been reported as a safe and enjoyable form of exercise that could improve balance in community-dwelling elders, decrease the risk of falls and enhance bone mineral density. In addition to a possible neuro-mechanism as interpretation of neuro-adaptation as a result of Tai Chi practice, many other health benefits of Tai Chi practice will be presented.

    Dr. Hongwei Guan image

    Dr. Hongwei Guan

  • I graduated from high school in Hong Kong and received college education in US studying chemistry with degrees in BSc from UCLA and PhD from Harvard University. My original research was in the field of molecular dynamics and collisional mechanism among atoms and molecules. After a two year stay at US National Laboratory in Oak Ridge, I joined Rockwell International Science Center. After a 32 years long career engaging in cutting edge IR&D projects ranging from materials, devices and ocean wave energy; I joined Hong Kong Baptist University as a visiting professor, a post that I held till present. My current research interest is in biomechanics, in particular the development of innovative devices to study gait and balance through the use of IMU measurement and the analysis based on Gait Force Model. I am involved in teaching Physics courses of all levels and have developed a popular and unique undergraduate general education course in “Creativity” to help students to unlock their creative potential.

    Abstract

    Gait Force Model: A new approach for gait analysis and balance monitoring

    This talk will present a new approach for gait analysis and balance monitoring.The technology uses an Inertia Measurement Unit (IMU) which can either be embedded inside a dynamically unstable platform for balance measurement or mounted on the lower back of a human subject for gait analysis. It records the acceleration data along three Cartesian coordinates. The raw data is then analyzed by Gait Force Model to extract vital bio-mechanics information both in the steady state (i.e. balance scale) and the dynamic state (i.e. gait analyzer).

    The balance scale measures postural deviation and balance index under visual and vestibular sensory input conditions. Despite its simple design and short measurement time, excellent agreement has been demonstrated between its performance and the high cost commercial balance unit over a wide dynamic range, thus making the portable balance scale an ideal tool for routine monitoring of balance index, fall risk assessment and other balance related health issues.

    The portable gait analyzer records the movement of human subject during walking, running or other physical activities. Gait Force Model is used to extract vital information that can be used to diagnose gait flaws and accurately assess the effectiveness of therapeutic measures with high temporal and spatial resolution. Its operational principle and applications in clinical diagnosis, rehabilitation monitoring, athletic training, sport apparel design and many other areas will be discussed.

    Dr. Jeffrey Cheung image

    Prof. Jeffrey Cheung

Close

日程安排

第一天 ( 7月21日 )

時間 會議內容 地點
8.00 - 9.00 am 注冊接待 WLB 103
9.00 - 9.30 am 開幕式 WLB 103
9.30 - 10.15 am 主題演講(一) Prof. Jeffrey Cheung WLB 103
10.15 - 10.30 am 茶歇 WLB 103 場外
10.30 - 11.15 am 主題演講(二) Prof. Russell R. Pate WLB 103
11.15 am - 12.00 pm 主題演講(三) Prof. Bradley J. Cardinal  Presentation PDF WLB 103
12.00 - 2.00 pm 午膳 浸大食坊
2.00 - 2.45 pm 主題演講(四) Prof. Yuanlong Liu Presentation PDF WLB 103
2.45 - 3.30 pm 主題演講(五) Prof. Stephen Wong WLB 103
3.30 - 3.45 pm 茶歇 WLB 103 場外
* 3.45 - 5.30 pm 口頭報告發表 詳情 WLB 103 & WLB 104
* 4.15 - 5.45 pm 海報發表 詳情 林護國際會議中心
5.45 - 6.45 pm 會議 WLB 106

第二天 ( 7月22日 )

時間 會議內容 地點
9.00 - 9.45 am 主題演講(六) Prof. John Reilly Presentation PDF WLB 103
9.45 - 10.30 am 主題演講(七) Dr. Mark Kelly Presentation PDF WLB 103
10.30 - 10.50 am 茶歇 WLB 103 場外
10.50 am - 12.00 pm 海報發表 詳情 林護國際會議中心
12.00 - 2.00 pm 午膳 浸大食坊
2.00 - 2.45 pm 主題演講(八) Dr. Hongwei Guan WLB 103
2.45 - 3.45 pm Dr. Mark Kelly's Exercise Engagement Workshop Workshop PDF WLB 103
3.30 - 3.45 pm 茶歇 WLB 103 場外
3.50 - 5.05 pm * 口頭報告發表 詳情 WLB 103 & WLB 104
5.20 - 6.20 pm * 學會周年大會* 2017年會議 湖南師範大學 WLB 103
7.00 - 9.00 pm 大會晚宴 聯福樓,思齊樓2樓

會場位置

WLB103 夏利萊博士及夫人演講廳, 永隆銀行商學大樓

會議注冊

預先注冊費 ( 在 30/05/2016 前登記 ) 注冊費

SCSEPF 會員費用

USD 30

HKD 240

SCSEPF 會員費用

USD 180

HKD 1400

USD 200

HKD 1600

非 SCSEPF 會員費用

USD 200

HKD 1600

USD 220

HKD 1720

午膳費用

USD 7

HKD 50

* 現在可以透過paypal在網上付款,你可以選擇visa, master或者是銀聯。 銀聯必需選擇國家為中國。


如果你已注冊, 可以登入後台: 連結


論文投稿

第十五屆華人運動生理及體適能學者學會週年大會

  1. 論文的評選依據其質量、與主题相關程度以及研究性質。為了鼓勵英文的使用,在同等條件下英文稿件將會被優先考慮。請注意此標準在口頭和海報展示中均適用。
  2. 論文作者文責自負,摘要的接受條件是未在學術會議或雜誌期刊上發表過。
  3. 摘要必須完整,應該包括研究目的,研究方法,结果討論以及研究結論。
  4. 摘要請控制在400字以內,格式可參考摘要樣本。作者在提交摘要時,請注明申請意向(口頭報告或海報交流)。原則上,口頭報告的第一作者(報告者)僅可有一篇論文報告,而海報交流則不受此限。
  5. 所有摘要存儲格式為Windows適用的Word格式。
  6. 摘要提交截止日期為2016年5月10日,逾期者,論文可能不能發表於會議論文彙編內。

住宿推薦

香港旅遊

Contact Us

: (852) 34116433/34115758

: (852) 34115756

: aaqol@aaqol.hkbu.edu.hk

: 15th-conference@scsepf.org

: 香港九龍塘聯福道34號林思齊樓1樓110室香港浸會大學許士芬博士體康研究中心

Design & Powered by